The ancient Roman philosophy

As one reads about the daily lives of ancient Romans, one runs across the two major schools of philosophy: stoicism and epicureanism. These schools, along with other smaller schools such as cynicism, contended for the minds of the citizens of the Roman Empire. However, these schools were not proselytizing by nature. Citizens were attracted to them per individual tastes and mindsets.

Alongside this, one observes that the intellectuals among the ancient Romans, such as Cicero, were not great believers in the pagan gods of the day. The attitude to religion overall was that of customary common practice, rather than having a prepackaged set of beliefs which had to be digested by each follower. It appears that it was mainly near the Eastern borders of the empire that people were more prone to pay obeisance to their potentates and thus, had a more servile attitude towards their gods.

Daily lives of ancient Romans

We read about patrimony, evergetism, and other interesting practices of the ancient Romans.

Also, it is interesting that the Romans regarded the gods as merely one step above the humans, who were in turn seen as one step above animals. So, the cultured Romans did not believe in a servile relationship with gods unlike the peoples of Eastern regions of those times.

Slavery was seen as quite natural and part of daily life, although some of the followers of stoicism later on did have reservations with this practice.

All these and other fascinating details can be gleaned from the fascinating History Of Private Life. This is a multi-volume work encompassing periods all the way from ancient Rome to the modern day.